Virgil Ortiz’ 1680 Fantasy

Virgil Ortiz is from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico, where he was born in 1969 and where he still lives. His grandmother Laurencita Herrera and his mother, Seferina Ortiz, were both renowned Pueblo potters. While Oritz works in several mediums, he primarily considers himself a potter.

Victor Ortiz pottery

His creations are focused on a historical event that occurred in his part of the world in 1680. The Pueblo Rebellion that took place in that year has been called the first American revolution. Pueblo tribes throughout the province of Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico banded together to drive out the Spanish settlers, a goal they accomplished, ridding the province of 2,000 Spaniards.

Oritz tells that story through the creation of sci-fi characters leading the rebellion in the year 2180. In Ortiz’s story, Tahu, a young blind woman, leads the Venutian soldiers in a futuristic rebellion. With forces that include an army of blind archers and aeronauts she leads her people on a quest to find a new safe place to live after their homeland has been destroyed.

Victor Ortiz figurine
Kade, Cacique of the Horseman Tribe
Victor Ortiz character
Tahu
Victor Ortiz costume
Aeronaut costume

Photos are of Virgil Ortiz works on display at the Montclair (N.J.) Art Museum. You can see more of his art at https://www.virgilortiz.com/.

This entry was posted in Art and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Virgil Ortiz’ 1680 Fantasy

  1. Donna Janke says:

    What an interesting approach blending the past and future to tell a story in art. Lovely work.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Kelly MacKay says:

    I love everything about this. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

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