Art Florentine

The David

Galleria dell’Accademia

Rape of the Sabines

Rape of the Sabines, Jean de Boulonge, 1582

Bartolini sculpture

Monumento de Adam Albrecht Adalbert Conte di Neipperg, Lorenzo Bartolini, 1832

Galleria degli Uffrizi

Tribuna at the Uffrizi

The Tribuna. In the forground is the Sythian Slave, produced in the 2nd Century AD. Behind is the Medici Venus which dates back to 1st Century BC.

Piero Della Francesca portraits

Portraits of Duke Federico de Montefeltro and His Duchess, Piero della Francesca, 1465

Botticelli portrait

Portrait of a Young Man with Medal, Sandro Botticelli, c. 1475

Duomo Florence

Florence Duomo

Giardino della Gherardesca

Garden sculpture

Swimming in the garden

 

This entry was posted in Art, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Art Florentine

  1. heraldmarty says:

    I’ve never been to Florence but this museum looks amazing! The outdoor pieces are intriguing, especially Giardino della Gherardesca. Thank you so much for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sabrina Quairoli says:

    These pieces of artwork in Florence is lovely. I have cousins there but haven’t been in the area. The Giardino Della Gherardesca looking interesting. Thanks for sharing your trip.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. lenie5860 says:

    Ken, the statue Chimera, Dario Tironi really caught my eye as did the others in the grouping. It takes a very unique creative talent to make something that impressive from things we would often throw it. What a wonderful time you must have had to find all these treasures.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nice pictures of well known art works and personalities. We have a wonderful and interesting culture in Europe, haven’t we. Glad, but not surprised, that some artists in Florence are inspired by their past. It actually happens frequently in our part of the world.

    Like

  5. BroadBlogs says:

    These pieces are sublime. I wasn’t aware of the more modern art, but that is interesting, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My art teacher friend has gone on at length how impressed she was by the statue of David. I’ve yet to make it to Italy, but can’t wait to see all that you have posted pictures of here.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Donna Janke says:

    Great collections of art. It’s an interesting contrast between the outdoor modern sculptures and the older pieces.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Phoenicia says:

    The Rape of the Sabines statue is rather disturbing. I tried to identify the “setting” before reading the actual title!

    Like

  9. Florence to me, was also the intellectual beacon of Europe. Its past, and its present, has always been around art, philosopher, and science. Thanks for sharing these wonderful pictures with us.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Erica says:

    Art from different times in history is so fascinating. It is the only way we can get a glimpse into their lives and their beliefs. Generations from now, people will be able to look back at us via photographs, films, and television shows. But for most of history, artwork was some of the most revealing artifacts left behind. I’ve never been to Florence but these all seem worth checking out.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I’ve not yet been to Florence, but I do love Italian and Renaissance art. Thx for the great post and the wonderful pics.

    Like

  12. Andy says:

    Some background music would go well with this post – Florence was the birthplace of opera, after all.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. The pieces look great. You had to chance to see some wonderful history while you were over there.

    Like

  14. ramonamckean says:

    I recall a lot of copycat Davids around Florence. Such a classy city is Florence (Firenze)! Il Ponte Vecchio (“the old bridge”) was a favourite of mine.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. pjlazos says:

    Just love the art!

    Like

  16. It’s been four years since my time in Florence, so I appreciate seeing the sights again through your eyes. Lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s